theme by meliapond

Ninety years ago on this date, April 17, 1924, three companies merged to form Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, better known as M-G-M, which would become the largest, wealthiest, and most prolific studio of Hollywood’s Golden Age. As founder Louis B. Mayer said, “I want to make beautiful pictures about beautiful people.”

Many of the most important and beloved American movies, including The Big Parade, Grand Hotel, The Wizard of Oz, and Singin’ in the Rain, to name just a few, were made at M-G-M. It has been estimated that about one fifth of movies ever made in the United States were partially shot at the studio. This footage comes from a behind-the-scenes tour short, made in 1925, soon after the establishment of M-G-M.

posted 19 hours ago · 497 notes


When you think somebody’s going to kiss you and then… sigh. Clara Bow and Buddy Rogers in Wings (1927).

When you think somebody’s going to kiss you and then… sigh. Clara Bow and Buddy Rogers in Wings (1927).

posted 21 hours ago · 218 notes


Mabel Normand and Charlie Chaplin in Gentlemen of Nerve (1914).

Mabel Normand and Charlie Chaplin in Gentlemen of Nerve (1914).

posted 1 day ago · 285 notes


I got to be the number-one fan of Hitchcock’s The Lodger (well, at least first in line), which was my last screening of TCMFF, complete with live accompaniment by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra.

I got to be the number-one fan of Hitchcock’s The Lodger (well, at least first in line), which was my last screening of TCMFF, complete with live accompaniment by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra.

posted 2 days ago · 27 notes


From Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s A Matter of Life and Death (1946).

From Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s A Matter of Life and Death (1946).

posted 3 days ago · 167 notes


I got this snapshot of 88-years-young Jerry Lewis at his handprint and footprint ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theater.

I got this snapshot of 88-years-young Jerry Lewis at his handprint and footprint ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theater.

posted 3 days ago · 41 notes


From Alice Guy’s “Madame a des envies” (1907).

From Alice Guy’s “Madame a des envies” (1907).

posted 3 days ago · 189 notes


From Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger (1927). I just saw this at the Egyptian Theater as the grand finale (for me, at least) to the TCM Classic Film Festival 2014.

From Alfred Hitchcock’s The Lodger (1927). I just saw this at the Egyptian Theater as the grand finale (for me, at least) to the TCM Classic Film Festival 2014.

posted 4 days ago · 331 notes


Maureen O’Hara in John Ford’s How Green Was My Valley (1941). Today at TCMFF, I had the honor of seeing her introduce the film at the El Capitan theater. Humbled by all the audience’s admiration, she told us, “Don’t be fooled into thinking I do magical things!” Well, sorry, Maureen, but I would have to respectfully disagree.

Maureen O’Hara in John Ford’s How Green Was My Valley (1941). Today at TCMFF, I had the honor of seeing her introduce the film at the El Capitan theater. Humbled by all the audience’s admiration, she told us, “Don’t be fooled into thinking I do magical things!” Well, sorry, Maureen, but I would have to respectfully disagree.

posted 5 days ago · 99 notes


From Clive Brook’s On Approval (1944).

From Clive Brook’s On Approval (1944).

posted 5 days ago · 201 notes


Warren William in Roy Del Ruth’s Employees’ Entrance (1933). I saw this last night from a 35mm Library of Congress print at TCMFF!

Warren William in Roy Del Ruth’s Employees’ Entrance (1933). I saw this last night from a 35mm Library of Congress print at TCMFF!

posted 6 days ago · 66 notes


From Funny Face (1957).

From Funny Face (1957).

posted 6 days ago · 295 notes


A few incredibly cool people I got to see in person today—close enough to take these pictures! (And, no, they’re not great pictures, but my hands were trembling.)

  • Tippi Hedren
  • Maureen O’Hara
  • Margaret O’Brien
  • Mel Brooks
  • Shirley Jones
  • Leonard Maltin

Thanks to my red carpet credentials, I was there lined up with the press at the world premiere of a new restoration of Fred Zinneman’s Oklahoma! doing my best not to gape too obviously. I actually got to talk to Leonard Maltin and Margaret O’Brien—plus a few other TCMFF special guests—and ask them about the films that, in their opinions, most exemplify the theme of family. I’ll hopefully be posting about all about that soon.

posted 1 week ago · 69 notes


Elsa Lanchester as The Bride of Frankenstein (1935).

Elsa Lanchester as The Bride of Frankenstein (1935).

posted 1 week ago · 206 notes


Color footage of Hollywood in 1931, processed with Cinecolor, from the travelogue short “Round About Hollywood.”

posted 1 week ago · 952 notes